About

Rebecca Desnos

About

Rebecca Desnos is a natural dyer, designer, writer and publisher in the UK. Author of 'Botanical Colour at your Fingertips' (available on Amazon) and publisher of the new magazine 'Plants Are Magic'.

PLANTS ARE MAGIC MAGAZINE


Plants Are Magic is a bi-annual magazine that launches on 1st April 2017. It's a celebration of botanical creativity and is for makers, dreamers and plant lovers. It's an exploration of the human relationship with plants.


The pages are full of stories from plant-lovers, artisans, therapists, growers and specialists from all over the world, with a selection of interviews, tutorials and recipes. The content is timeless, and each issue is like a book that you will cherish forever.

INDEPENDENTLY PUBLSIHED

The magazine is created by me - Rebecca Desnos . I am a plant-dyer in the UK, and at the beginning of this year, I decided to unite many of my botanical curiosities and passions in the form of a magazine.

I began my self-publishing journey in 2016, when I wrote and published my first natural dyeing book, Botanical Colour at Your Fingertips. I am passionate about sharing my craft with people all over the world, and post about my dyeing experiments on Instagram regularly.

My book (shown below) is available to purchase in paperback format on Amazon, eBook format on Etsy and wholesale bundles (contact me for more details)



Sharing knowledge with others is the main drive behind what I do; I enjoy showing you how you can make beautiful dye colours from the plants that you have growing around you.

This has evolved into a desire to unite many different forms of botanical creativity. I am inspired by many incredibly talented people that I have met on Instagram over the last few years, and in Plants Are Magic magazine I share some of the amazing stories of these artisans, plant healers and specialists.

Plants Are Magic is a magazine that comes from my heart and is a true pleasure to compile. I hope that it brings some plant magic to your life.




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